Adam’s Peak Sri Lanka

Climbing to the top of Adam’s Peak Sri Lanka takes a lot of determination, enthusiasm and a quality pair of hiking shoes. It stands at 7,359 feet, with its highest point peeking out of the clouds in the central highlands of Sri Lanka. The hike is lengthy but extraordinary and thousands of adventurers’ trek up the mountain each year. Reaching the top is a real achievement and you’ll be rewarded with stunning views of the natural surroundings and beyond. If you’re planning on embarking on a hike up Adam’s Peak anytime soon, here’s everything you need to know.

Climbing the mountain

The hike has somewhere between 5,000 and 6,000 worn steps that are crumbling away by the day. So, technically, you’re stepping the whole way to the top. But, that doesn’t mean you don’t need a good pair of hiking boots or trainers to avoid blisters and sore feet. It’ll take you around two to four hours to get to the top and then no more than two hours to come back down again. Thankfully, the Adam’s Peak steps make the descent much easier and it won’t take you anywhere near as long to get back down the mountain.

When should you go?

You’ll need to consider the weather before hiking up Adam’s Peak. The recommended time of year to climb is between January and May because that’s when you’ll get the best weather. Remember to take a backpack with a few essentials such as a bottle of water, a raincoat and some snacks. Keep an eye out for Sri Pada, the ‘sacred footprint’, on your way up; it’s a unique rock formation at the summit, believed by some to be the footprint of Adam, St. Thomas or even Buddha.

The trails

You’ll have six trails to choose from when you climb Adams Peak Sri Lanka. If you’re new to hiking or just want the easiest route possible, start from Dalhousie. You have the option to hire a guide to take you to the top, but you’ll probably be fine without the extra expense. Both the Nallathanni and Palabaddala trails are pretty popular with both locals and tourists. However, the Palabaddala one is slightly longer than Dalhousie at around 15km.

If you want to take a route up Adam’s Peak with slightly fewer crowds, go for the Kuruwita-Erathna trail, which you can catch a bus to from nearby towns and resorts. The others, such as Murrarywatte, Malimboda and Mookuwatte are routes less travelled. But all three join with the Palabaddala trail eventually, so you might prefer to simply start with it from the beginning. The Hatton trail is the steepest option but it’s at least 5km shorter than the others.

The average climb is around 7km uphill, which is a challenge for even the fittest hiker, so be prepared to stop for regular breaks and drink plenty of water. If you’d like to climb at night so you can see the sunrise from Adam’s Peak, the trails are lit up to make things easier.