Bimini In The Bahamas

Bimini refers to a region of the Bahamas made up of two islands (North and South Bimini) and a clutch of cays, just 80km off the coast of Florida, which makes it the closest of the Bahamian islands to the USA. It’s often called ‘Hemingway’s Hideaway’, because it was much loved by the writer and was even used as a location in one of his novels, Islands in the Stream.

Hemingway lived on North Bimini for two years from 1937 and wrote and fished extensively during that time. The idyllic setting and the tranquillity of island life are summed up by Hemingway’s character Roger in Islands in the Stream: “Swim, eat, drink… read, talk, read, fish, fish, swim, drink, sleep.” Sounds heavenly, doesn’t it?

Vast beaches

Bimini is well known for its long, unspoilt beaches, the largest of which can be found at Resorts World, which runs along the Atlantic coast. Lots of bleached white sand and sapphire blue oceans make it easy for you to find a relaxing spot. So, kick off those flip flops and soak those cares away the Bahamian way.

Most of Bimini’s beaches are on the west side of North Bimini. Head to Alice Town where Radio Beach, Blister Beach and Spook Hill run endlessly into each other, an idyllic stretch of warm and flawless sand for you to sink your toes into. Or take up the challenge and walk from beach to beach to beach, working up an appetite for fresh seafood from one of the many beachside shacks.

South Bimini boasts a two-mile-long beach that hugs the west shore of this fascinating island. Tiki Hut Beach is lined with vegetation, including thatch palms and sisal plants and, as the name suggests, is dotted with tiki huts for welcome shade. It’s the perfect place to relax with a long drink on a hot day.

There are a great many more beaches to be found in Bimini’s cays. Turtle Rocks, Piquet Rocks, Holm Cay, North Cat Cay, South Cat Cay, and Ocean Cay are all secluded spots where you’ll feel like a castaway in your own peaceful paradise.

Diving and snorkelling sites

Local legend in these parts lays claim to Atlantis, a vast city swallowed by the sea in Greek myth. This belief is centred around an underwater road system known as Bimini Road, which many think is part of the lost city. Whether you believe the story or not, the Stones of Atlantis create a fascinating focal point for diving and snorkelling expeditions. Located west of the bluff of North Bimini, they span a length of 152 metres and are accessible by boat only, with several businesses on the island offering trips from the North Bimini coast.

Other well used dive sites in Bimini include Tuna Alley, Victory Rock, the Nodules and the Sapona, the vast wreck of a liberty ship that sank off Turtle Rocks in 1926. It’s inhabited by a large variety of marine wildlife, including grunts, blackbar soldierfish and resting nurse sharks under the hull at the stern. A big draw for snorkellers, divers and underwater photographers, the Sapona is a must-see for novices too, as it sits half exposed in very shallow waters.